Tips to attempt RBI Grade B Phase II-English Essay

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Tips to Attempt RBI Grade B Phase II English Essay

Dear RBI Grade B Aspirants

In the series of articles on how to clear sectional cutoffs/prepare for RBI Grade B, we have covered English, Quantitative AptitudeReasoning and General Awareness, thereby completing Phase I for RBI Grade B 2015. We received tremendous feedback from our candidates and are glad that our fellow MockBankers loved the posts. Continuing the preparation tips on RBI Grade B, today we will cover tips and tricks to prepare and clear Essay Writing topic of English Descriptive paper of Phase II.  Just so you know, we will cover entire English Descriptive Paper in our posts in upcoming days.

 

The English Descriptive paper for RBI Grade B Phase II is of 100 marks and  90 minutes duration. The essay   writing portion carries 40 marks, making it a high value topic. Unlike other banking topics (Quant, reasoning ,GA etc), descriptive English ka maamla kuch alag hi hai! (Descriptive English paper is a different ballpark altogether). This is because, as banking exam aspirants, we are conditioned to solve aptitude questions, do quick calculations, apply logic and choose the correct option from the given options. Therefore naturally we dread writing long essays about topics we barely know. Majority of candidates get nightmares about how they will write a 500+ words essay and clear the descriptive paper of Phase II.

Well, have no worries. We have prepared a proven strategy comprising of simple technique and tips to conquer the easy writing challenge. Though they might appear a little bit tedious at first, if you master them, there will be nothing stopping you from writing a great essay. So what is the strategy for writing a great essay. Its elementary,  get the following things right:

  1. Correct Grammar
  2. Flow or structure of points
  3. Minimal knowledge about the topic and
  4. Decent vocabulary.

You will be wondering either of the following:

Click on whichever question that came to your mind and see where it leads you.

***

 

 

Let us call the four points mentioned as Fab Four!

You’re a bit tensed wondering how will you master the Fab Four and thinking, kya likhunga exam mein. Don’t be tensed. We will go through each one of them and at the end of it you will come out to be the master of FAB FOUR.

Fab Four No. 1: Correct Grammar

Simple. Basic. Fundamental. And we mean it. RBI doesn’t wants amazing English experts from Oxford University. Just putting out your words in the right way is more than enough for this exam. Here are a few tips which you need to follow, which will make your writing look more professional.

1. Set the plurality straight. Confused? Let me explain.

He is looking at the wall.

Here, is looking is the verb. You cannot write are looking because that would become plural tense. You have to maintain a singular tense in the verb because he is singular. Makes sense? Similarly, They are playing a game. Here, you cannot write they is playing. Is playing is singular tense, while they is plural.

2. Set the gender straight.

She is using her glasses.

They are using their glasses.

He is using his glasses.

This situation is different when Ram is using Radha’s glasses. Then, he is using her glasses.

3. Set the tenses straight.

This is a bit more complicated than the other two.

Simple – Perfect – Continuous: These are the three types of any tense.

Therefore, we have nine tenses. The technique is that whenever past perfect, present perfect or future perfect occurs, then the words had done, are doing, will do will appear.

 

Tense Verb
Simple Past I did
Past Perfect I had done
Past Continuous I was doing
Past perfect continuous I had been doing
Simple Present I do
Present Perfect I have done
Present Continuous I am doing
Present perfect continuous I have been doing
Simple Future I will do
Future Perfect I will have done
Future Continuous I will be doing
Future Perfect Continuous I will have been doing

Follow these simple rules and you are good to go with grammar.

Fab Four No. 2: Structure of Points

This is the easiest of the four. During the 3 minutes you prepare the essay in your mind, you have to organize your points in the correct sequence of logic, sequence of occurrence or any other sequence which makes sense. Also, there has to be a structure to the essay of which we will tell you about a little later in detail.

Fab Four No. 3: Minimal Knowledge about the Topic

Don’t worry about not knowing the topic either. If you can think logically, the points will occur to you immediately. If on the other hand, you find it difficult to explain about topics you don’t know enough about, here is a list of topics generally covered in Descriptive English paper of RBI Grade B.

  1. Current Affairs – happenings in politics, international affairs, sports, moral or ethical issues, etc.
  2. Sports
  3. Great thought leaders
  4. Freedom Fighters
  5. Mahatma Gandhi
  6. The environment – pollution, conservation, etc.
  7. Development
  8. Sustainable development
  9. Rural development
  10. Banks in the rural areas
  11. Nuclear weapons
  12. Virtual Workplace
  13. Health insurance and wealth
  14. Education and technology
  15. Peace and India
  16. Political relations
  17. Growth and inflation
  18. Travel and tourism
  19. The RBI
  20. Economic issues
  21. The internet
  22. Technology

If you have four points for these major topics, that is more than sufficient. For preparation, just glance through these topics on the internet and in the newspapers, and you will be thoroughly prepared in no time. Do you want us to post about these topics? Click here to drop us a word, and we will take it up.

Fab Four No. 4: Vocabulary

You do not need extraordinary vocabulary in order to write an essay. If you are able to construct a decent sentence, then you are prepared to write an essay. Think of the most grammatically correct, complicated sentence and post it in the comments below, we will review it for you.

There are three main tips to expand your vocabulary:

  1. Talk in English. All the time. When you stumble, look it up or ask us the question and you will find the right word to put in to that sentence.
  2. Take MockBank’s Daily Vocabulary Challenge.
  3. Read The Hindu, and listen to BBC News. They write and speak amazing English. Write down the words you don’t understand and look it up online or in the dictionary.
  4. Start writing e-mails with the grammarly app. This will teach you how to write a correct sentence.

***

 

 

Now that you have mastered the Fab Four, you know for sure that you don’t need rocket science to write a good essay. However you do need to follow the steps given below during the exam to ace the essay.

Step 1: Points

Before jumping in to typing whatever thoughts that come to your mind. Spend 3-4 minutes to gather your thoughts and frame at least 4-5 points in your mind. These points will make up the content for the body of the essay.

Step 2: Introduction

Spend a maximum of 5 minutes for writing the introduction.

The first line is what we call the ‘welcome’ line. It is the line which puts the tilak on the head of the person reading the essay. Such a line should begin with stating the problem. For example, if you the question says, write about the pros and cons of media, then your first line will be, The media in the 21st century has pros as well as cons.

Once you write the welcome line, you write the ‘history’ line. This line is one line about what the track record of the topic has been, or what the subject has been like over the past few years. For example, you may write, In the past few years, the media in India, especially has grown to be the fourth pillar of democracy, acting as a watchdog over the other three pillars. Makes sense?

Next you write about how the topic has evolved or grown to today. How it exists today, and how it is in the present day. This line will be along the lines of Today, however, the media has been exposed to several corrupt practices and biases, which make the news not very reliable.

After these three lines, you may write another description line or you may give the introduction to the body. For instance, In the following paragraphs, the pros and cons of X topic is discussed.

Limit the introduction to 150-200 words.

Step 3: Body

Spend 3-4 minutes per point, which makes it 15 minutes for the body.

Remember the points you noted down in the first three minutes? You will write about them in the body of the essay. The best part of the body is that every point will be like the introduction itself, so you just have to follow a pattern.

First you take the first point you thought about, and write the introductory line to it. Such as, the first positive thing about the media is…etc. Once you are done with this introductory line, you continue with how the point began, or the history of the point. Once you finish that, you write two more lines describing the point, and how it is related to the main topic. Then, you write a concluding line to this point such as, therefore, this is how this point directly affects the main point.

Repeat this process with the other three or four points you have and you have 5 paragraphs successfully in your kitty.

Step 4: Conclusion

Spend exactly 5 minutes for the conclusion.

This is basically the summary of your essay, and the solution to the problem.

In this paragraph, you first mention all the points written in the body and say what relation they have to the topic. For instance, Thus, a, b, c, and d are the pros of the media today, and e, f, g and h are the cons of the media.

The next sentence would be about the solution to the problem that exists. The solution can be of various types. The first type of solution is partial, where you give the solution to the few negatives that you have written in the body. The second type of solution is whole solution, where the topic itself is the problem, for example, air pollution and you give some solutions as to how to curb air pollution.

And finally, the last sentence is the advice. The general statement. You have to end the entire essay with a general statement applicable to the topic, or to majority of the people. This could be like. Hence, we should all make sure to do our best to remain eco-friendly and not expand the hole in the ozone layer anymore. Or, hence, we must all make sure to keep an eye on the kind of news that we are being fed with and not take any news given for its face value.

Step 5: Read Again

Spend exactly 3 minutes for this step. Carefully read your essay for any spelling error, punctuation error or grammatical error and correct them.

Step 6: Celebrate

Take one minute to celebrate your finishing the essay. Do a mental dance or mental singing. Stretch your arms and fingers which are tired from the continuous writing. And shout loudly in your mind. 😀

You are finally done with your essay!!!

The bottom line is, you can write an essay with the simplest of words possible. You don’t need high funda words. Follow the above tips and you will be so thoroughly prepared to write the essay in the exam.

Bonus Tip

Practice is the key to writing good essays. Type some pieces of your writing in the comments section below and receive a personalized feedback about it.

Don’t forget to tell us how you liked this article. All the best!


Click here to read Sample Committee Report & Draft Proposal Format RBI Grade B Phase II exam.

Click here to read Tips and Template for Letter/Report Writing RBI Grade B Phase II

  • GAURAV MISHRA

    Economic performance cannot forever hide the underlying ills

    Economic Performance of a country takes into account the economic costs associated with all the sectors of economy.The more a country produces (agriculture), the more it manufactures (secondary) and the better services it provides, the country is declared to be a better economic performer.India in the recent years have achieved huge success in all the sectors and amidst slowing global economy, IMF has hailed it as the sweet spot of the world. Economic performance can be defined on certain parameters viz a viz GDP, NNP, GPP (in terms of ppp) etc. Measuring Indian performance on the above mentioned scale, one can easily ascertain its robust economy with GDP hurling at 7.6% and per capita income hovering around 5500 $. India has become a trillion dollar economy and it ranks 7th in GDP and 3rd in GDP (ppp).

    With successful Mangalyan mission, gigantic defense expenditure and robust service sector, the glory of Indian economy growing is sung everywhere.We have developed indigenous submarines, missiles. We have become a part of MTCR and are bidding for NSG. We have the largest standing army in the world and we are the top FDI investment destination in 2015.The remittance recieved reflects the performance of our peers abroad.CEOs of most of the billion dollar companies are Indian.We have one of the largest group of billionaires in the world.

    In the above paragraphs, we have lauded the glory of Indian development and the same can be stated for almost any developing and developed country. But we have missed some very crucial aspects of development. Performance differs greatly from development.A student scoring 100/100 can vastly change the average performance of whole class.But can it be considered inclusive ? Definitely not. So far whatever performance we have discussed is more or less average and is not inclusive.As per UNDP report, India ranks 130/180 in both HDI and GII. Poverty as per MPI is enormously high hovering around 55%.Our performance in Gender equality is equally frustrating with GDI of 0.795 putting us in most bogus nations despite the fact that we are most promising in terms of economic performance.A growth can never be sustainable in the long run if it is not inclusive.

    Also ,while discussing economic performance of a nation, one must include the social cost associated with the growth.As per a report, India is the 4th largest Green house gas emitter and the top three being US,EU and China, best economies in the world are polluting the environment at the worst .This certainly will lead to ecological disruption if not tackled right now. Howsoever developed our economy be,if it does not care for the environment result will be apocalyptic.As per Bruntsland Report (1987), a sustainable development is the one which meets the need of present without compromising the abiltiy of future generation to meet their own needs. But most of the economies are not adhering to it. Consuming non renewable sources of energy at alarming speed and rupturing the ecological balance will certainly be a bane for future generation for which we will never be forgiven.

    In a competitive run to be the best, countries are ignoring the underlying principle of growth.A growth should always be associated with overall development and happiness.It is the time that nations introspect and rather than performing activities just to be a better economic performer, they must forgo environmentally unsustainable , economically unsustainable , socially unsustainable .Rather than focussing on GDP growth, they must come out with something just like Bhutan. Bhutan measure Gross Hapiness Index rather than GDP. An economic performance must provide satiation and happiness to the mass.Marginal utility must be high.Rather than joining the herd to be a nuclear power and missile equipped, countries must move towards a race of eliminating poverty and cutting down pollution.

    As per our ex president Kalam, future generation will not remember us by how many temples we made, but by educational institutes we make. On a similar line, the future generation will remember us not by the GDP percentage or Missile Technolgies we have given them, but by the unpolluted environment and life standard that we have passed on.Besides happiness and fresh air is what everyone’s basic purpose of life is.

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  • arctictern

    Terrorism as a major challenge faced globally

    Terrorism is one of the gravest problems that society faces today. It’s not at all a new phenomenon and its presence can be traced back to the ancient society of the first century. But over the years ‘terrorism’ like other avenues of life, has undergone tremendous changes. It has now become more lethal, wider spread and more difficult to control. It’s, today, a much debated issue in all the countries of the world- developing or developed, and thus stands as a serious challenge before civil society. Terrorism and the challenges posed by it to the world nations are discussed below.

    Defining terrorism itself is a challenging task, as there is no common consensus exists amongst world countries regarding its definition. Every country defines terrorism in its own way according to its suitability. A freedom fighter for one country can be a terrorist for another country. A lot of examples can be taken from the history of independence struggles of colonial nations to support this. Generally, any unlawful use of violence or threat of violence which aims to inculcate fears amongst the masses may be defined as terrorism.

    Every action is motivated by some causes; terrorism is not an exemption. In prima face analysis religious interests, ethnic minority interests and economic interests may be seen as the main motives behind terrorism in the contemporary world. But, in fact no terrorist group stands for above reasons, instead they takes these reasons as shields to gain the sympathy of the outside world. The ultimate aim of terrorists is to gain political control or gain control over land. The causes of the emergence of terrorism can be found in socio-economic situations. Imbalance in growth and development, growing political unrest, ill-treatment at home, prevalence of corruption etc. are some of the factors responsible for the birth of terrorism. The Constitutions of most of the democracies provide for equal rights, but often these may be denied to one group. These discriminations give birth to a sense of alienation. Sometimes, terrorist groups are formed as a reaction to government’s any move or decision. Furthermore, desires to bring about a change in existing social set-up in the larger interests of society, the terrorist groups seek political goals through the means of violence. Above all, a wish to improve one’s lot socially and economically derives an ordinary person to terrorism. It would not be out of place to mention that democratic system of governance adopted in almost all the countries of the world directly or indirectly contributes to the growth and expansion of terrorism. Since democracy offers freedom of speech and movements, more targets are exposed to terrorist attacks. The terrorists cynically exploit the rights and freedoms granted by it to them.

    Technologically advanced countries are also facing challenges in curbing terrorism. Terrorist groups today are well equipped with state of the art technologies. They are well armed with small, portable and easy to operate weapons. They are supplied with highly sophisticated weapons which are at par with the defense forces of the nation. Terrorist’s today work under global network. They have established contacts with groups in different countries and carry on their activities in quiet collaborations with them. They offer training and finances to other groups. Sometimes terrorists’ activities are sponsored by bigger terrorists’ organisation. Contacts were detected between the ULFA and the LTTE of Sri Lanka, the Lashkar-e-Taiyeba and the Al-Qaeda, etc.

    Terrorists are the greatest enemies of the society, because they undermine its stability by creating chaotic conditions like mass killings, damage and destruction. Generally, populated public places like airports, railway stations etc . . . are their targets, but, sometimes they go for soft locations like schools, hospitals, trains and buses where security is lax and security forces are not vigilant. The economic loss and damage that terrorism is capable of wreaking on a country today can be as appalling as that brought about by way of various segments of economy are badly affected by it, but tourism is the worst affected. It can be seen in Kashmir, which once famous as ‘heaven on earth’, is today lagging in tourism.

    The battle against terrorists cannot be won in isolation. Nor can this battle be won by government alone, even if it must be deemed to have the primary responsibility for marshalling the national resources and will. If we have to inoculate ourselves against the vendors of global terror, we will need to produce a new cohesion behind a national purpose. Garnering public support to fight terrorism and creating awareness among people to be alert and vigilant about their surroundings is the key to thwarting the evil designs of terrorists.

  • Chintu

    Role of RBI in curbing inflation
    It is well known fact that poison if taken in less quantity acts as a medicine. Hence inflation if kept within a range is good for steady growth of economy. However it is easier said than done. This objective is achieved by various fiscal measures and monetary measures by government and central bank i.e. Reserve Bank of India (RBI) respectively. This is where RBI comes into the picture.
    Inflation in the economy is due to supply side factors and demand side factors. Money supply in the economy has direct effect on the demand side factors. RBI directly influences money supply in the economy by various rates such as CRR, SLR, Repo rate, Reverse repo rate which are reviewed in bi-monthly policy. If these rates are high then it is called tight monetary policy because money is sucked out of the system. There is less money running behind the goods which keeps the demand in check and inflation under control. However if these rates are low then vice-versa.
    Also RBI indirectly controls the money supply by changing Loan to value (LTV) ratio and moral persuasion through meetings and talks with the top executives of the banking sector which has indirect effect on the inflation.
    Off late however it is found that these policy measures taken by RBI are not being transmitted in the economy via the prime lending rate (PLR) of the banks. Therefore, RBI has recently introduced marginal cost of funds methodology for calculation of PLR. Previously each bank was having its own methodology such as average cost of funds in calculating PLR. This move is surely going to streamline once again the control of RBI over inflation.
    Indian economy has gone through turbulence in recent past. The need of the hour is to make the financial environment conducive to foreign investment. This can only be done if the inflation is kept within predictable range. Keeping this view in mind the government and RBI have signed agreement wherein RBI has been made responsible to keep in check the inflation to the rate of 4% with +_2% deviation. RBI has to explain the reason for deviation of inflation beyond this range and enumerate the steps to be taken for course correction.
    Hence officially inflation control has been handed over to RBI.

    • Vaibhav

      Chintu That is a well written essay. Please give us time to review it for you.

  • MockBank

    That was a beautiful and extremely informative essay. We loved the flow, the structure, the lavish use of technical terms and the impressive vocabulary. Your grammar also is pretty good. Your break up of sentences is splendid, as it makes the reader understand this essay easily.
    Now that we have got the main elements out of the way, it is the finer aspects that we have to pay attention to:
    Punctuation
    Article usage
    Re-check
    Please insert commas, full stops ‘:’ and ‘;’ wherever appropriate.
    Also, insert ‘a’, ‘an’ and ‘the’ wherever appropriate. If want to learn where to use articles, then send us an email back and we will respond to you.
    Since you have written such a good essay, I felt some of the mistakes you made were due to not checking your work before posting it. Do check your essay before submitting it: half your errors will disappear only because of rechecking.
    Below is a detailed analysis of your essay along with corrections:
    __________________________________________________________________
    Role of RBI in controlling the inflation

    In 1924, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar put forth his work ‘The problem of Rupee: issues and solution’ to the Hunter Commission (insert full stop). The great visionary stated that the establishment of the Reserve Bank of India was the need of the hour. The issues highlighted at that time were (insert comma here) what should be the value of the rupee? How should it be decided? Today, the issues remain the same but the perspective has changed. What should be the rate of inflation? How should it be decided?

    Inflation is the unprecedented rise in the cost of products usually due to a greater supply of money in the economy. RBI institutes various monetary measures to control inflation. The most important ones among them are cash reserve ratio (CRR), repo rate, reverse repo rate, statutory liquidity ratio (SLR) and open market operation (OMO). The Monetary policy of the RBI is able to affect different variables in the economy. The change in SLR trickles down to a change in the interest rates of banks. This is able to control the liquidity in the market. Credit availability is the main reason for this. Exchange rate is also determined by these factors.

    There are certain limitations with the role of the RBI in controlling the inflation. Firstly (insert comma here) monetary policy cannot work in isolation. It has to work in collaboration with the fiscal policy of the government. Fiscal policy works on the supply side inflation while RBI works on the demand side inflation. Secondly it is less effective due to minimum financial inclusion. People in villages still rely on traditional source of loans and saving. Thirdly, the RBI doesn’t have direct control over food inflation. In India agriculture is mostly monsoon dependent which determines the rate of inflation.

    The role of RBI in inflation control is limited. The debate between government control over monetary policy continues. But it is much desirable to emerge slowly and steadily, rather than moving towards faster economic growth in lesser time. Growth has to be obtained in a right way. It is much easier to obtain growth by giving a quick stimulus. But we have lessons to learn from Brazil.

    Learn a lesson from Brazil, which predicted a high growth rate after the exploration of the oil reserves in the country (sentence was incomplete). It started giving concessions and subsidies to the various companies related to oil drilling etc. The government lowered the interest rate to give a quick stimulus to the economy. It started giving loans without analysing the output or the result. Finally it lead to bad loans and budget deficit increased.

    At the same time restrictive monetary policy stunts the investment growth in the economy. Lack of investment may lead to rise in unemployment rate. Ultimately affecting the economic growth rate of the country. Thus the role of the RBI in controlling the inflation has to be balanced. Also (insert comma here) independence of RBI in framing monetary policy has to be intact. Fiscal policy and monetary policy have to work in co-ordination for sustainable growth of financial institution and economy.

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    All the best to you for your exam! Keep up the excellent work and you are good to go for the exam. Do keep visiting our blog to check for updates. Thanks for your response to our article

    Regards,

    Team MockBank

    • Kate

      Thanks for the detailed analysis. Yes I overlooked some of the errors. I should have checked twice before posting. Do tell about usage of articles.

      • Vaibhav

        Sure Kate

  • Kate

    Role of RBI in controlling the inflation
    In 1924, Dr. B. R. Ambedkar put forth his work ‘The problem of Rupee: issues and solution’ to Hunter Commission The great visionary stated establishment of Reserve Bank of India as the need of the hour. The issues highlighted at that time were what should be the value of rupee? How it has to be decided? Today, the issues remain same but the perspective has changed. What should be rate of inflation? How it has to be decided?
    Inflation is the unprecedented rise in cost of products usually due to greater supply of money in the economy. RBI institutes various monetary measures to control inflation. The major among them are cash reserve ratio (CRR), repo rate, reverse repo rate, statutory liquidity ratio (SLR) and open market operation (OMO). Monetary policy of RBI is able to affect different variables in economy. The change in SLR cripples down to change in interest rate of bank. This is able to control the liquidity in the market. Credit availability is the main reason for it. Exchange rate is also determined by these factors.
    There are certain limitations towards role of RBI in controlling the inflation. Firstly monetary policy cannot work in isolation. It has to work in collaboration with fiscal policy of the government. Fiscal policy works on the supply side inflation while RBI works on the demand side inflation. Secondly it is less effective due to minimum financial inclusion. People in villages still rely on traditional source of loans and saving. Thirdly, RBI don’t have direct control over food inflation. In India agriculture is mostly monsoon dependent which determines the rate of inflation.
    The role of RBI in inflation control is limited. The debate between government control over monetary policy continues. But it is much desirable to emerge slow and steady, rather than moving towards faster economic growth in less time. Growth has to be obtained in a right way. It is much easier to obtain growth by giving a quick stimulus. But we have lessons to learn from Brazil.
    Taking a lesson from Brazil, which predicted a high growth rate after the exploration of the oil reserves in the country. It started giving concessions and subsidy to the various companies related to oil drilling etc. The government lowered the interest rate to give a quick stimulus to the economy. It started giving loans without much analyzing the output. Finally it lead to bad loans and budget deficit increased.
    At the same time restrictive monetary policy stunts the investment growth in the economy. Lack of investment may lead to rise in unemployment rate. Ultimately affecting the economic growth rate of the country. Thus role of RBI in controlling the inflation has to be balanced. Also independence of RBI in framing monetary policy has to be intact. Fiscal policy and monetary policy have to work in co-ordination for sustainable growth of financial institution and economy.